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PHOTOS: ‘Walker, Texas Ranger’ home hits market

PHOTOS: ‘Walker, Texas Ranger’ home hits market

Need space to practice roundhouse kicks and fist-enforced Texas justice? You're in luck. Photo: WENN

DALLAS (AP) — Need space to practice roundhouse kicks and fist-enforced Texas justice? You’re in luck: Chuck Norris’ spacious Dallas home, complete with a gym featuring memorabilia from his “Walker, Texas Ranger” television series, is on the market.

SEE PHOTOS OF THE HOME BELOW

The Mediterranean ranch-style home in a tony neighborhood of Dallas also was the on-screen residence of Cordell Walker, the roundhouse-kicking Texas Ranger who battled villainy at every turn.

Norris portrayed Walker in the CBS series that ran for eight seasons. It ended in 2001, but lives on in syndication.

The 7,362-square-foot home is listed for $1.2 million. Along with the weight room, it has four bedrooms, several bathrooms and a theater.

Listing agent Rogers Healy says Norris and his wife have homes elsewhere and want to “downsize.”

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