News

Appeals Court Judges Say Ban On Same Sex Marriages Should Go

Appeals Court Judges Say Ban On Same Sex Marriages Should Go

Photo: WINA

A three-judge panel of the Richmond-based Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has added more fuel to the fire over Virginia’s 2006 constitutional ban on same-sex marriages. The panel voted 2-1 to declare that the voter-approved prohibition of gay and lesbian marriages is unconstitutional. One judge who wants to get rid of Virginia’s constitutional amendment is Roger Gregory, who was first appointed by President Clinton. Gregory was joined by Judge Henry Floyd, who was a 2011 appointee of President Obama. The ruling delights Democratic Attorney General Mark Herring (pictured) and gay rights activists such as Reverend Robin Gorsline of Richmond. Victoria Cobb of the Family Foundation of Virginia is upset about the judges’ action. Cobb believes the Commonwealth should continue to define a marriage as the union of one man and one woman.

Latest Stories

in Local, Local Sports, Sports, UVA, UVA Sports

UVA Clinches ACC Series With Notre Dame

baseball bat

The UVA baseball team swept a Saturday double-header with Notre Dame 9-1 and 4-2.

in Entertainment

This weekend in entertainment history

rainman

A look back on some of Hollywood's most memorable headlines.

in National

Amanda Knox murder conviction overturned

FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2014, file photo, Amanda Knox prepares to leave the set following a television interview in New York. Knox is engaged to Colin Sutherland, a musician who recently moved to Seattle from New York, a person close to the Knox family confirmed for The Associated Press. Knox’s murder conviction in the 2007 stabbing of her roommate has been reinstated by an Italian court, but the former college exchange student maintains her innocence and vows she won’t willingly go back to Italy. Both Knox and Sutherland are 27. No wedding date had been set.

Italy's highest court has overturned the murder conviction against Amanda Knox, bringing to a definitive end the high-profile case.