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There’s no Nickelback in ’22 Jump Street’

There’s no Nickelback in ’22 Jump Street’

NICKELBACK:The band "just said no" to allowing their music to be the backdrop to a drug scene in "22 Jump Street." Photo: Associated Press

Canadian rockers Nickelback banned producers behind Jonah Hill’s new comedy “22 Jump Street” from using their music during a drug hallucination scene.

The actor reveals he had the “How You Remind Me” hitmakers’ songs blasting out from a stereo onset to help him get into character as he pretended to be under the influence during shooting, but the band refused to grant movie bosses permission to keep the tunes in the film.

Hill admits he has no idea why Nickelback objected to the request, but he wants fans to keep their music in mind while watching the scene because it’ll make the sequence “way more awesome than weird”.

Hill adds, “We specifically chose the music of Nickelback to play during my sequence, and they wouldn’t let us use it…

“It’s me having a complete drug trip to a Nickelback song, which I find hilarious, and they said no, so just imagine it with your minds and stuff.”

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