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Seth Rogen faces ‘merciless’ retaliation from N. Korea

Seth Rogen faces ‘merciless’ retaliation from N. Korea

WATCH YOUR BACK, SETH:Seth Rogen is laughing off the threats from North Korea. Photo: Associated Press

Seth Rogen has laughed off protests from the North Korean government after it warned the U.S. faces “merciless” retaliation if his upcoming film “The Interview” is released.

The “Knocked Up” actor is at the center of a political storm over his new action-comedy movie, about an American journalist who is recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

The film is due to hit cinemas around the world from October, and a foreign ministry spokesperson for the Asian country has issued a series of complaints ahead of its release.

Speaking through the state-run KCNA news agency, the representative brands The Interview a “wanton act of terror”, adding, “Making and releasing a movie on a plot to hurt our top-level leadership is the most blatant act of terrorism and war and will absolutely not be tolerated.

“If the U.S. administration allows and defends the showing of the film, a merciless counter-measure will be taken.”

However, Rogen has refused to take the situation seriously.

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