News

Seahawks’ Super Bowl victory parade expected to draw huge crowd

Seahawks’ Super Bowl victory parade expected to draw huge crowd

'LEGION OF BOOM:' Seahawks fans are celebrating their first Super Bowl win. Photo: Associated Press

By Jonathan Kaminsky

(Reuters) – Up to 500,000 Seattle Seahawks fans were expected to brave sub-freezing temperatures to celebrate the football team’s first Super Bowl title at a parade set to wind through the city’s downtown on Wednesday.

The Seahawks trounced the usually high-scoring Denver Broncos 43-8 on Sunday to win their first NFL championship in franchise history.

It was a particularly sweet triumph for a city whose previous major professional men’s sports team championship came a generation ago, when the SuperSonics captured the National Basketball Association’s crown in 1979. That team left for Oklahoma City in 2008.

PHOTOS: Super Bowl XLVIII | COMPLETE COVERAGE: Seattle Seahawks crush Denver Broncos in team’s first Super Bowl win

Due to kick off at 11 a.m. local time, the planned 90-minute parade will see the Seahawks riding in amphibious World War II-era Duck vehicles normally used by tourists.

The route ends at CenturyLink Field – its home field – where the team has lost only once in the past two years, and where season-ticket holders will be treated to a victory celebration.

Many school-aged children are expected be in attendance at the parade, with Seattle Public Schools Superintendent Jose Banda on Tuesday saying that principals would have discretion over whether to excuse absent students.

It was a reversal from his position a day earlier, when he said that students would not be excused in spite of a suggestion from Seahawks Head Coach Pete Carroll that they get the day off.

Carroll received a phone call on Tuesday from President Barack Obama, who commended the coach on the team’s “decisive victory” and said he looked forward to greeting them at the White House in the coming months, according to a White House statement.

Also on Tuesday, Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee proclaimed a statewide “moment of LOUDNESS” to take place during the parade. In a nod to the team’s fans, collectively known as the “12th Man” for their opponent-rattling rumbling during home games, Inslee ordered the organized screaming to occur at 12:12 p.m. on Wednesday.

“Our team is bigger, faster and stronger and the 12th Man is without question louder than anyone else in the nation,” Inslee said in a written statement accompanying the proclamation.

(Reporting by Jonathan Kaminsky in Olympia, Wash.; Editing by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle and Sofina Mirza-Reid)

Latest Stories

in Entertainment

This weekend in entertainment history

rainman

A look back on some of Hollywood's most memorable headlines.

in National

Amanda Knox murder conviction overturned

FILE - In this Jan. 31, 2014, file photo, Amanda Knox prepares to leave the set following a television interview in New York. Knox is engaged to Colin Sutherland, a musician who recently moved to Seattle from New York, a person close to the Knox family confirmed for The Associated Press. Knox’s murder conviction in the 2007 stabbing of her roommate has been reinstated by an Italian court, but the former college exchange student maintains her innocence and vows she won’t willingly go back to Italy. Both Knox and Sutherland are 27. No wedding date had been set.

Italy's highest court has overturned the murder conviction against Amanda Knox, bringing to a definitive end the high-profile case.

in National

Time for Iran to make tough decisions in nuclear talks

In this March 26, 2015, photo, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, center, leaves a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and other U.S. officials at a hotel in Lausanne, Switzerland. U.S. and Iranian diplomats gather at a Baroque palace in Europe, a historic nuclear agreement within reach. Over Iraq’s deserts, their militaries fight a common foe. Leaders in Washington and Tehran, capitals once a million miles from each other in ideological terms, wrestle for the first time in decades with the notion of a rapprochement.

Six world powers and Iran move closer to a deal, but there are still major disagreements.