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Roger Daltrey blames The Who gigs for hearing loss

Roger Daltrey blames The Who gigs for hearing loss

The Who performs at The Arena at Gwinnett Center on Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Atlanta. Photo: Associated Press/Photo by Robb Cohen/RobbsPhotos/Invision

Rocker Roger Daltrey can bond with his The Who bandmate Pete Townshend over their health woes – he is slowly losing his hearing.

Townshend has told for years how he is afflicted with tinnitus, which causes a permanent ringing in the ear, and blames the band’s high-decibel gigs in the 1960s and ’70s for the condition.

Now Daltrey has revealed he is also suffering from poor hearing and agrees with the guitarist that they are paying for their years of rock ‘n’ roll high jinx.

He tells Absolute Radio’s Pete Mitchell, “I’m quite deaf these days. It’s come to us all. All that racket in the ’70s and ’80s and ’60s. So I usually now work with these kind of in-ear monitors… The problem I’ve got is that the system I use and the monitor system aren’t compatible. So I have to try and go back to working with monitors and I can’t really hear myself well enough. I tend to sometimes over sing a bit.”

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