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DEA agents make big crackdown on synthetic drugs

DEA agents make big crackdown on synthetic drugs

BATH SALTS:Bath salts are seen in an undated handout photo from the Drug Enforcement Agency. Photo: Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Drug Enforcement Administration agents served hundreds of search and arrest warrants in at least 25 states on Wednesday as part of a crackdown on synthetic drug producers and distributors, the Associated Press reported.

A DEA official confirmed to Reuters that the agency is involved in an operation targeting synthetic drugs.

Synthetic drugs include blends of marijuana and drugs known as bath salts and Molly, and they are known to have dangerously unpredictable effects on consumers who are usually unaware of the levels of mind-altering chemicals in each blend.

The DEA has increased its scrutiny over the drugs since they gained popularity around 2010.

Wednesday’s raids were conducted in Alabama, Florida, New Mexico and other states, the Associated Press reported.

(Reporting By Julia Edwards; Editing by Bill Trott)

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